For The People

Vusamazulu Credo Mutwa: A legacy denied but not forgotten

Through his travels, he realised how the African continent was changing, how the culture was dying and becoming a forgotten and lost land. He saw how the European colonisation to the African continent had robbed its people of not just the land but had caused a confusion to their identity and culture. He believed that Africans had been brainwashed deliberately so that they could lose their sense of pride, through beatings, torture and slavery.

His life was never a smooth sailing one. As a young boy he travelled and dwelled in many different places because of his father’s profession as a builder. During this time he went through a traumatic experience that caused him to be ill, he was soon to realise that this illness was not just an illness but a sacred illness which meant that he had a calling to become a shaman. Faced with a decision between Christianity and Shamanism the young boy chose the latter. He soon developed a wanderlust for the world that surrounded him and began to travel South Africa, the African continent, and many other parts of the world.

Vusamazulu Credo Mutwa, was a Zulu Sangoma (shaman), known as an Isanusi, which is the highest form of a shaman in the Zulu culture. He was often referred to as the encyclopedia of African knowledge. Mutwa has made an incredible contribution in literature, arts, and history. His literature drew upon African mythology, folklore, extra-terrestrial theories and encounters, as well as his views on international conspiracies by international governments.

Through his travels, he realised how the African continent was changing, how the culture was dying and becoming forgotten and lost. He saw how the European colonisation to the African continent had robbed its people of not just the land but had caused a confusion to their identity and culture.

Vusamazulu Credo Mutwa
PHOTO: SUPPLIED

He believed that Africans had been brainwashed deliberately so that they could lose their sense of pride, through beatings, torture and slavery. In his words he said “If you rob a people of their self-respect, self-pride, self -knowledge and self-dependency, you turn them into robots, forever dependent on you. Even if you stood up and walked away from these people and gave them back their freedom. They would still follow you because they their minds are still enslaved even though their physical bodies are free”. The advocate of African people was of the view that freedom and independence were an illusion and that black people can never be free not until they knew who they really were.

The traditional healer who had an incredible knack for writing, sought to revive and preserve the culture of African people, more so in his place of birth. This is when the concerned Mutwa started to document African knowledge through story-telling, speeches, and other prose. The Sanusi build museums, one of which now stands in Soweto, Gauteng. He created sculptors which are scattered in many parts of the Southern African country. He was clearly a man of many talents, the Sanusi was also passionate about creating music and singing.

In 1964, the author published his book, Indaba My Children. The book is a collection of gripping legends of history of the Bantu. Which was described The Sunday Tribune, Durban as “An epic book”. This book came to be internationally acclaimed and is regarded as a chart to the stories of African tribal culture. His second book was published in 1969; My People, My Africa. In 1986, Let not my country. He then wrote, Song of The Stars in 1996 and Isilwane in the same year. His recent writing includes an illustrative novel called “Tree of Life Trilogy” which is based in his internationally acclaimed book, Indaba My Children.

In 2003 he wrote the, Zulu Shaman: Dreams, Prophecies and Mysteries. This book offers the reader a glimpse into myths, shamanic practices, healing techniques, oracles and prophecies. He relays his experiences as a shaman in the post-colonial South Africa. He is also famous for his accurate predictions of world events such as the 1976 Youth Uprising, the assignation of Chris Hani.

The legendary humanitarian, author and traditional healer met his death on Wednesday, in Kuruman where he has lived for many years with his wife and children.

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